PP FINANCES

Former PP deputy acknowledges questionable cash “stashed in envelopes”

Lawyer Jorge Trías Sagnier writes in EL PAÍS of the need for Rajoy’s party, and others, to come clean about internal funding

Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy and PP secretary general María Dolores de Cospedal at the start of Monday's National Executive party meeting. / Ballesteros (EFE)

A former Popular Party (PP) lawmaker has come forward to acknowledge the practice of payments to the conservative organization's leaders -- sometimes "given in cash-stuffed envelopes" -- which supports allegations in the press that PP treasurers had set up a secret slush fund used to hand out bonuses to top officials.

Jorge Trías Sagnier, who served in Congress from 1996-2000, wrote in an EL PAÍS column published in the Spanish edition on Monday that Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy and PP secretary general María Dolores de Cospedal need to offer the public explanations about the party's financing, even though they both put an end to this practice. Trías Sagnier is the first PP representative, past or present, to publicly admit that such practices existed in the party.

In the article, Trías Sagnier writes: “Now the PP, and especially its ex-treasurer, Luis Bárcenas – with whom I have trekked through mountains, had long conversations and whose friendship I will not renounce, whatever his future may be – are faced with understandable scrutiny. They must, then, clarify and explain the system of financing so that we can believe in them. And the opposition – all of its members and the Socialists in particular – must state publicly if they have also made use of these bad practices.”

"If there isn't much faith placed in those who are governing this nation, how can they demand the sacrifices they are asking citizens to make?" Trías Sagnier concludes.

Y ADEMÁS...

Para poder comentar debes estar registrado en Eskup y haber iniciado sesión

Darse de alta ¿Por qué darse de alta?

Otras noticias

LATIN AMERICA

Brazil presidential hopefuls remain silent on abortion

With the election just days away, the tragedy of illegal procedures is failing to trigger public debate

Mexican army detains soldiers over massacre

Government had previously claimed Tlatlaya casualties were the result of skirmishes between military and criminals

The new Brazilian middle class: a decisive demographic in elections

Voters who climbed out of poverty will hold the key to the October 5 poll

Mexican drug gangs kidnapping bus passengers to turn them into hitmen

Cartels in Tamaulipas state are growing their ranks through forced recruitment

Lo más visto en...

» Top 50

Webs de PRISA

cerrar ventana