DEMONSTRATIONS

Thousands march on Workers’ Day in protests against cuts and labor reforms

Unions vow to go out on the streets "until things change"

“There are so many reasons to protest, where do you want me to start?” says one student

Two women taking part in the demonstrations in Madrid on Tuesday. / Juanjo Martin (EFE)

Tens of thousands of people took to the streets around Spain on Tuesday to mark International Workers’ Day. The largest rally took place in Madrid, where the labor unions said some 100,000 people joined a march in protest against the sweeping spending cuts and labor reforms of the Popular Party government.

“The \[general strike of March 29\] is not the end of it; the first of May is not the end of it; we’ll keep coming onto the streets to annoy them, to make them change,” said the leader of the CCOO labor union, Ignacio Fernández Toxo. His counterpart at the UGT union, Cándido Méndez, said that the government’s labor reform plan “has brought the working conditions of China to Spain.” Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, he said, “wants to impose the Thatcher mandate on us and destroy public services.”

“There are so many reasons to protest, where do you want me to start?” said a student in Madrid, summing up the growing sense of resentment among Spaniards at spiraling unemployment and an increasingly grim social and economic outlook. Among the placards and banners in the capital was one that read: “Hands up! This is a contract.”

In Barcelona, labor unions put the number of marchers at 100,000, but the local authorities placed the number at closer to 15,000. Some 80 rallies took place in 60 Spanish cities in all.

Let’s see if this society wakes up for once,” said Vicente, a 92-year-old “ex-combatant of the Republic.” “What else has to happen first?”

Para poder comentar debes estar registrado en Eskup y haber iniciado sesión

Darse de alta ¿Por qué darse de alta?

Otras noticias

LATIN AMERICA

Mexico’s Supreme Court quashes referendums on energy reform

Leftist forces vow to keep fighting and will take their case to a regional tribunal

“We can’t negotiate over suffering; we want our children back alive”

Parents of missing Iguala students call on Mexican president to find their loved ones

Falling oil price puts Mexico on alert

Jan Martínez Ahrens Mexico City

Lower profit margins making expensive projects less desirable for foreign investors

“We are not a populist government”

In this exclusive interview with EL PAÍS, Chilean president Michelle Bachelet discusses her far-reaching reforms

Lo más visto en...

» Top 50

Webs de PRISA

cerrar ventana